AMERICAN INDEPENDENCE FILM ★★★★★
FESTIVAL / 27.02-5.03 ★★★

 

AFS: Shorts

The last barn dance

The last barn dance (2017)

USA / 2017 / 32’

Directors: Jason Arthurs, Ted Richardson

Synopsis

Randy Lewis knows that losing his dairy business would mean losing his livelihood – his farm is limping along through an economy that has decimated most other family farms in Alamance County – but Randy is most worried about losing his way of life and ending a family heritage that has hosted nearly 50 years worth of barn dances.

Forever, Chinatown

Forever, Chinatown (2017)

USA / 2017 / 31’

Director: James Q. Chan

Synopsis

Forever, Chinatown is a story of unknown, self-taught 81-year-old artist Frank Wong who has spent the past four decades recreating his fading memories by building romantic, extraordinarily detailed miniature models of the San Francisco Chinatown rooms of his youth.

This film takes the journey of one individual and maps it to a rapidly changing urban neighborhood from 1940s to present day.

A meditation on memory, community, and preserving one’s own legacy, Frank‘s three-dimensional miniature dioramas become rare portals into a historic neighborhood and a window to the artist’s filtered and romanticized memories and emotional struggles. In his bargain with immortality, Frank announces plans to cremate his exquisite works with him upon his death in order to ‘live inside them forever’ in his afterlife.

I am Yup’ik

I am Yup’ik (2017)

USA / 2017 / 17’

Directors: Nathan Golon, Daniele Anastasion

Synopsis

An Alaskan Yup’ik teenager leaves his tiny village and travels across frozen tundra to compete in a basketball tournament and bring pride to his village.

Joe’s Violin

Joe’s Violin (2017)

USA / 2017 / 24’

Directors: Kahane Cooperman, Raphaela Neihausen

Synopsis

In the Academy Award nominated short documentary Joe’s Violin, a 91-year-old Holocaust survivor donates his violin of 70 years to a local instrument drive, changing the life of a 12-year-old school girl from America’s poorest congressional district, and unexpectedly, his own.

Joe’s Violin poignantly illuminates how the power of music brings light in the darkest of times and how a small act can have a great impact.